Mathieu Amy




Associate professor


Phone : (33)1.40.97.74.78
Mail : mamy@parisnanterre.fr


Education

 

1999 - 2002. Bachelor Degree in Psychology. Universities Paris 8 and Paris 13.

2002 - 2004. Research Master in Psychology. University Université Paris Nanterre, France.

2004- 2007. PhD in Neurosciences. University Université Paris Nanterre, France.

2010 - 2011 Master in Clinical Neuropsychology. Université de Lille 3, France.

 

 Employement

 

2007-2008. Research and Teaching Assistant. University Université Paris Nanterre, France.

2008 - 2009. Post-doctoral researcher (Fyssen Grant) at the NIOO-KNAW, Department of animal ecology, Centre for Terrestrial Ecology, The Netherlands.

2009 - 2010 Research and Teaching Assistant. University Université Paris Nanterre, France.

 

Research interests

Effects of social environment on conspecifics' interactions

Interindividual variations in communication and sexual selection

 

Publications

 

Ung D., Amy M. & Leboucher G. 2011. Heaven it's my wife! Male canaries conceal extra-pair courtships but increase aggressions when their mate watches. PLoS ONE, 6(8): e22686.

 

Amy M., Sprau P., de Goede P. & Naguib M. 2010. Effects of personality on territory defence in communication networks: a playback experiment with radio-tagged great tits. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 277, 3685-3692.

 

Garcia-Fernandez V., Amy M., Lacroix A., Malacarne G. & Leboucher G. 2010. Eavesdropping on male singing interactions leads to differential allocation in eggs. Ethology, 116, 662-670.

 

Tanvez A., Amy M., Chastel O. & Leboucher G. 2009. Maternal effects and ß-carotene assimilation in canary chicks. Physiology and Behavior, 96, 389-396.

 

Amy M. & Leboucher G. 2009. Effects of eavesdropping on subsequent signalling behaviours in male canaries. Ethology, 115, 239-246.

 

Amy M., Monbureau M., Durant C., Gomez D., Théry M. & Leboucher G. 2008. Female canary mate preferences: differential use of information from two types of male-male interactions. Animal Behaviour, 76, 971-982.

 

Amy M. & Leboucher G. 2007. Male canaries can visually eavesdrop on conspecific food interactions. Animal Behaviour, 74, 57-62.

 

Personnal website for pdf

                                                                   


Updated on 21 septembre 2011